Stay Connected

INSTAGRAM

YOUTUBE

TWITTER

©2023 by STATUS International. Proudly created with STATUS.

STATUS International Branding 

A Division of Robertson Holdings Group, Inc.

STATUS International Branding Team

80 M St. SE, Suite 100

Washington, DC 20003

Hours of Operation

Monday - Thursday 10AM- 6PM

Friday Closed

 

Send us an email: admin@statusbranding.com

Living a Life of Status: How to Be Remembered


Have you ever gone into a meeting without knowing what to say or ask to get the sale?


You really wanted the sale but you simply didn’t know how to prepare to speak with the CEO or high-level officer of the company.


You want their business but you don't want to sound like a pushy salesman or a lousy one at that.


I am going to give you a guide on the four types of questions to ask any high-level officer to get the sale every time!


These five principles will shape any successful business pitch because it’s intuitively positioning your brand in your prospects' minds without them noticing it.


Here’s my nerdy disclaimer: We are following the Global Neuronal Workspace Theory.


This theory is just technical for defining consciousness as the global information-sharing network.


Our brain/consciousness has 5 specialized local processors.


Long Term Memory - Past


Evaluative Systems - Value


Attentional Systems - Focusing


Motor Systems - Future


Perceptual Systems - Present


These five processors in your brain are a part of the global workspace of information to pull from.


At any given moment, the workspace selects information from a subset processor and establishes a clear representation of the information to be disseminated virtually to any other processors.


In conscious marketing, we use questions to jog the memory that will fire neurons in every subset of the human consciousness, in turn, creating an intense focus on you to make the prospect sell themselves on you.


The first step is to fire off neurons in your prospect's long term memory with a question about the past.


Ask a question about their childhood aspirations, a bad experience, or something notable in their past that is no longer existent.


No need to be pushy or seemingly creepy, a simple question such as, “What did you want to be when you grew up?”


The goal here is to conjure up thoughts about their past worth comparing to later on in the meeting.


For example, if you’re a marketer like me, you’ll ask them have you ever had a bad experience with one in the past?


The goal is to get them to unfold some of the underlying experiences that shaped their present.


The second part of this is to get them to explain or assess their response to fire off neurons in their evaluative systems which brings up one’s values.


Ask “Why and what happened?” in reference to the bad experience.


The first step is to fire off neurons in your prospect's long term memory with a question about the past.


Ask a question about their childhood aspirations, a bad experience, or something notable in their past that is no longer existent.


No need to be pushy or seemingly creepy, a simple question such as, “What did you want to be when you grew up?”


At the end, you’ll refer to what made that experience bad and then explain how you will avoid that mistake in working with you.


Note: The top salespeople in the world live in this space.


They have their prospects evaluating their responses and it allows the salesperson to develop personalized recommendations.


This presents you as empathic and that you too are very similar as it relates to personality.


Now that you have most of their consciousness on the situation at hand (humans cannot focus on two things at once always do your best to have them focus on you).


You need to frame their problem and the solution into a tangible form that can be attained in a short amount of time.


Reconnect with them by restating their past experience and explicitly stating that you do have something in common.


Now dangle the desire and talk about the future based on their values.


For example, “Would you say that you actually achieved your childhood dreams?” or “How you like it if you could actually get more customers without the hassles of [insert items from their past experiences]”


Speak about what the future could look like without even mentioning your product or service.


You want to just fill their consciousness with information relevant to them; humans are “survival of the fittest”, we only care about ourselves and not the product/service you offer”.


Now to finish the pitch with framing your product/service to obtain the future desire with a few present actions.


Simplification is key.


You need to be able to say that they can get that beautiful picture of future results with just a few steps that a person can take TODAY.


Frame the solution as if it only takes a click to get what they want.


For example, “What if you could get more customers today by placing your website link on my blog and let the rest take of itself?”


Regardless of what has to go on the background to make this happen, sell them on the simplified process to obtaining their future results.


After this meeting, pitch, etc. you will have the prospect of asking those critical questions now about price, timeline, contracts, etc.


Now humans operate on a cost-value “balance scale”.


What this means is that the only reason people are returning your phone calls or lining up to buy your product or service is that the cost may outweigh the value they will get in return.


Timothy J Robertson is the creator of STATUS International, an artificial intelligent Creative Concierge platform, to automate hiring and managing the world’s best artists. Timothy has been on a mission to integrate machine learning technology into the creative process to offer artists short term projects and clients' creative control over the vision. Take a Test Drive at statusbranding.com -- or -- you can get in contact at admin@statusbranding.com

0 views